Spotify podcast subscription is here, and it already has an upper hand over Apple

It's only fair to share...Share on RedditShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Tumblr

Apple introduced podcast subscriptions earlier this month. Now, Spotify is also throwing its hat in the ring, following a report last week that predicted the same. The music streaming giant has today announced paid subscriptions for podcasts, but is taking a different route than what Apple has put into place when it comes to revenue sharing.

The paid subscription for podcasts starts rolling out for creators in the US starting today, with plans of expansion into more markets in the coming months. But unlike Apple Podcasts that offer in-app subscriptions, Spotify will offload the subscription process to Anchor. What this means is Spotify will also be able to avoid the 30% fee Apple charges for in-app payments.

spotify subscriptions body

Paid content in the Spotify app will be identifiable with a lock icon on play button

As for the paid podcast content, it will be discoverable in the Spotify app just like regular content, but it will stand out from the free content with a lock icon on the play button. For now, there are 12 partners who will be rolling out paywalled podcasts, but Spotify has already started accepting submissions from the waitlist to add more creators who can charge users for their content.

Another key difference between Spotify and Apple’s approach to podcast subscription is how revenue is shared. Apple will charge creators a fixed annual fee and will also take up to a 30% cut of the revenue. Spotify, on the other hand, won’t charge any fee, and will not take any cut of the subscription – not until 2023 – which is when the streaming service will start taking home a 5% share.

spotify podcasts

So, how much will podcast subscriptions on Spotify cost? Well, creators have the freedom to choose between three pricing tiers – $2.99/month, $4.99/month, and $7.99/month. They can also choose which episode remains free, and which one is paywalled. Aside from Spotify, users will be able to enjoy paid podcasts from their RSS feed as well. All subscription management can be done from Anchor, and the changes made there will instantly reflect in the Spotify app.

The post Spotify podcast subscription is here, and it already has an upper hand over Apple appeared first on Pocketnow.

It's only fair to share...Share on RedditShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Tumblr

Spotify podcast subscription is here, and it already has an upper hand over Apple

It's only fair to share...Share on RedditShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Tumblr

Apple introduced podcast subscriptions earlier this month. Now, Spotify is also throwing its hat in the ring, following a report last week that predicted the same. The music streaming giant has today announced paid subscriptions for podcasts, but is taking a different route than what Apple has put into place when it comes to revenue sharing.

The paid subscription for podcasts starts rolling out for creators in the US starting today, with plans of expansion into more markets in the coming months. But unlike Apple Podcasts that offer in-app subscriptions, Spotify will offload the subscription process to Anchor. What this means is Spotify will also be able to avoid the 30% fee Apple charges for in-app payments.

spotify subscriptions body

Paid content in the Spotify app will be identifiable with a lock icon on play button

As for the paid podcast content, it will be discoverable in the Spotify app just like regular content, but it will stand out from the free content with a lock icon on the play button. For now, there are 12 partners who will be rolling out paywalled podcasts, but Spotify has already started accepting submissions from the waitlist to add more creators who can charge users for their content.

Another key difference between Spotify and Apple’s approach to podcast subscription is how revenue is shared. Apple will charge creators a fixed annual fee and will also take up to a 30% cut of the revenue. Spotify, on the other hand, won’t charge any fee, and will not take any cut of the subscription – not until 2023 – which is when the streaming service will start taking home a 5% share.

spotify podcasts

So, how much will podcast subscriptions on Spotify cost? Well, creators have the freedom to choose between three pricing tiers – $2.99/month, $4.99/month, and $7.99/month. They can also choose which episode remains free, and which one is paywalled. Aside from Spotify, users will be able to enjoy paid podcasts from their RSS feed as well. All subscription management can be done from Anchor, and the changes made there will instantly reflect in the Spotify app.

The post Spotify podcast subscription is here, and it already has an upper hand over Apple appeared first on Pocketnow.

It's only fair to share...Share on RedditShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Tumblr

Spotify podcast subscription is here, and it already has an upper hand over Apple

It's only fair to share...Share on RedditShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Tumblr

Apple introduced podcast subscriptions earlier this month. Now, Spotify is also throwing its hat in the ring, following a report last week that predicted the same. The music streaming giant has today announced paid subscriptions for podcasts, but is taking a different route than what Apple has put into place when it comes to revenue sharing.

The paid subscription for podcasts starts rolling out for creators in the US starting today, with plans of expansion into more markets in the coming months. But unlike Apple Podcasts that offer in-app subscriptions, Spotify will offload the subscription process to Anchor. What this means is Spotify will also be able to avoid the 30% fee Apple charges for in-app payments.

spotify subscriptions body

Paid content in the Spotify app will be identifiable with a lock icon on play button

As for the paid podcast content, it will be discoverable in the Spotify app just like regular content, but it will stand out from the free content with a lock icon on the play button. For now, there are 12 partners who will be rolling out paywalled podcasts, but Spotify has already started accepting submissions from the waitlist to add more creators who can charge users for their content.

Another key difference between Spotify and Apple’s approach to podcast subscription is how revenue is shared. Apple will charge creators a fixed annual fee and will also take up to a 30% cut of the revenue. Spotify, on the other hand, won’t charge any fee, and will not take any cut of the subscription – not until 2023 – which is when the streaming service will start taking home a 5% share.

spotify podcasts

So, how much will podcast subscriptions on Spotify cost? Well, creators have the freedom to choose between three pricing tiers – $2.99/month, $4.99/month, and $7.99/month. They can also choose which episode remains free, and which one is paywalled. Aside from Spotify, users will be able to enjoy paid podcasts from their RSS feed as well. All subscription management can be done from Anchor, and the changes made there will instantly reflect in the Spotify app.

The post Spotify podcast subscription is here, and it already has an upper hand over Apple appeared first on Pocketnow.

It's only fair to share...Share on RedditShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Tumblr

Spotify podcast subscription is here, and it already has an upper hand over Apple

It's only fair to share...Share on RedditShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Tumblr

Apple introduced podcast subscriptions earlier this month. Now, Spotify is also throwing its hat in the ring, following a report last week that predicted the same. The music streaming giant has today announced paid subscriptions for podcasts, but is taking a different route than what Apple has put into place when it comes to revenue sharing.

The paid subscription for podcasts starts rolling out for creators in the US starting today, with plans of expansion into more markets in the coming months. But unlike Apple Podcasts that offer in-app subscriptions, Spotify will offload the subscription process to Anchor. What this means is Spotify will also be able to avoid the 30% fee Apple charges for in-app payments.

spotify subscriptions body

Paid content in the Spotify app will be identifiable with a lock icon on play button

As for the paid podcast content, it will be discoverable in the Spotify app just like regular content, but it will stand out from the free content with a lock icon on the play button. For now, there are 12 partners who will be rolling out paywalled podcasts, but Spotify has already started accepting submissions from the waitlist to add more creators who can charge users for their content.

Another key difference between Spotify and Apple’s approach to podcast subscription is how revenue is shared. Apple will charge creators a fixed annual fee and will also take up to a 30% cut of the revenue. Spotify, on the other hand, won’t charge any fee, and will not take any cut of the subscription – not until 2023 – which is when the streaming service will start taking home a 5% share.

spotify podcasts

So, how much will podcast subscriptions on Spotify cost? Well, creators have the freedom to choose between three pricing tiers – $2.99/month, $4.99/month, and $7.99/month. They can also choose which episode remains free, and which one is paywalled. Aside from Spotify, users will be able to enjoy paid podcasts from their RSS feed as well. All subscription management can be done from Anchor, and the changes made there will instantly reflect in the Spotify app.

The post Spotify podcast subscription is here, and it already has an upper hand over Apple appeared first on Pocketnow.

It's only fair to share...Share on RedditShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Tumblr

Spotify podcast subscription is here, and it already has an upper hand over Apple

It's only fair to share...Share on RedditShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Tumblr

Apple introduced podcast subscriptions earlier this month. Now, Spotify is also throwing its hat in the ring, following a report last week that predicted the same. The music streaming giant has today announced paid subscriptions for podcasts, but is taking a different route than what Apple has put into place when it comes to revenue sharing.

The paid subscription for podcasts starts rolling out for creators in the US starting today, with plans of expansion into more markets in the coming months. But unlike Apple Podcasts that offer in-app subscriptions, Spotify will offload the subscription process to Anchor. What this means is Spotify will also be able to avoid the 30% fee Apple charges for in-app payments.

spotify subscriptions body

Paid content in the Spotify app will be identifiable with a lock icon on play button

As for the paid podcast content, it will be discoverable in the Spotify app just like regular content, but it will stand out from the free content with a lock icon on the play button. For now, there are 12 partners who will be rolling out paywalled podcasts, but Spotify has already started accepting submissions from the waitlist to add more creators who can charge users for their content.

Another key difference between Spotify and Apple’s approach to podcast subscription is how revenue is shared. Apple will charge creators a fixed annual fee and will also take up to a 30% cut of the revenue. Spotify, on the other hand, won’t charge any fee, and will not take any cut of the subscription – not until 2023 – which is when the streaming service will start taking home a 5% share.

spotify podcasts

So, how much will podcast subscriptions on Spotify cost? Well, creators have the freedom to choose between three pricing tiers – $2.99/month, $4.99/month, and $7.99/month. They can also choose which episode remains free, and which one is paywalled. Aside from Spotify, users will be able to enjoy paid podcasts from their RSS feed as well. All subscription management can be done from Anchor, and the changes made there will instantly reflect in the Spotify app.

The post Spotify podcast subscription is here, and it already has an upper hand over Apple appeared first on Pocketnow.

It's only fair to share...Share on RedditShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Tumblr

Spotify podcast subscription is here, and it already has an upper hand over Apple

It's only fair to share...Share on RedditShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Tumblr

Apple introduced podcast subscriptions earlier this month. Now, Spotify is also throwing its hat in the ring, following a report last week that predicted the same. The music streaming giant has today announced paid subscriptions for podcasts, but is taking a different route than what Apple has put into place when it comes to revenue sharing.

The paid subscription for podcasts starts rolling out for creators in the US starting today, with plans of expansion into more markets in the coming months. But unlike Apple Podcasts that offer in-app subscriptions, Spotify will offload the subscription process to Anchor. What this means is Spotify will also be able to avoid the 30% fee Apple charges for in-app payments.

spotify subscriptions body

Paid content in the Spotify app will be identifiable with a lock icon on play button

As for the paid podcast content, it will be discoverable in the Spotify app just like regular content, but it will stand out from the free content with a lock icon on the play button. For now, there are 12 partners who will be rolling out paywalled podcasts, but Spotify has already started accepting submissions from the waitlist to add more creators who can charge users for their content.

Another key difference between Spotify and Apple’s approach to podcast subscription is how revenue is shared. Apple will charge creators a fixed annual fee and will also take up to a 30% cut of the revenue. Spotify, on the other hand, won’t charge any fee, and will not take any cut of the subscription – not until 2023 – which is when the streaming service will start taking home a 5% share.

spotify podcasts

So, how much will podcast subscriptions on Spotify cost? Well, creators have the freedom to choose between three pricing tiers – $2.99/month, $4.99/month, and $7.99/month. They can also choose which episode remains free, and which one is paywalled. Aside from Spotify, users will be able to enjoy paid podcasts from their RSS feed as well. All subscription management can be done from Anchor, and the changes made there will instantly reflect in the Spotify app.

The post Spotify podcast subscription is here, and it already has an upper hand over Apple appeared first on Pocketnow.

It's only fair to share...Share on RedditShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Tumblr

Here’s how to play full Xbox games on Linux with xCloud (video)

Microsoft released a beta of their web-based xCloud game streaming service recently. It would seem that this version of the service will work with any web browser that supports WebRTC, so let’s see how that works.

I decided to plug an Xbox controller into the USB port of my Pinebook Pro running Manjaro Linux and the open-source Chromium web browser.  

If you have an Xbox Game Pass Ultimate subscription, you can try the new beta web-based streaming service at Xbox.com/Play as well. The system requirements say that you need a Windows 10 PC or an Apple iOS 14+ device, but… guess what… Linux works, too. 

Of course, you’ll also want a high-speed 10Mbps+ internet connection for the streaming, and an Xbox controller plugged in via USB or paired via Bluetooth.  Microsoft mainly built this version because Apple won’t let them make a game streaming app for the Apple App Store, so the web-based method is a workaround for that. The bonus is that this web-based version happens to work with a lot of other platforms too. 

Xbox Linux

This Pinebook Pro has extremely low specs by the way. It’s a six-core, 1.4GHz, Pine64 ARM processor with only 4GB of RAM and 64GB eMMC storage. If that was running Windows 10, everything would be laggy!  

See below for how Xbox Game Streaming actually works on this very inexpensive Linux laptop running Manjaro XFCE Linux.

As you’ll see, the simple games work quite well, while more action-oriented games are probably going to need a bit more processing power on the client-side. Outriders worked ok, but there was certainly some latency, and Halo 5 Guardians turned out to be practically unplayable. 

The post Here’s how to play full Xbox games on Linux with xCloud (video) appeared first on Pocketnow.

Spotify explores podcast subscriptions, but unlike Apple, it won’t charge creators

At its Spring Loaded event earlier this week, Apple introduced podcast subscriptions that will be rolled out for creators next month. The company will charge creators a monthly fee of $19.99 per year, while allowing them to set the price for their content that listeners will pay for. It looks like Apple will soon have some competition from another major player in the world of podcasts – Spotify. As per a report from TheWallStreetJournal, Spotify aims to diversify its financial stream by offering subscriptions.

“Apple’s podcast subscription, which rolls out next month to users, will have company. Spotify plans to announce its own offering next week, according to people familiar with the matter.”

Apple takes a healthy 30% cut from the subscription revenue. Spotify won't!

But more importantly, Spotify is not going to charge content creators – unlike Apple, which is collecting a fee of $19.99 on an annual basis as part of the Apple Podcasters Program. What is even more interesting is the fact that Spotify is not going to take a cut from the subscription revenue generated by creators, and will also allow them to set the price they want to charge their audience. Apple, on the other hand, take a 30% cut as part of its standard in-app purchase policy for the App Store.

Spotify has lately given a huge push to podcasts on its platform as the competition heats up with the arrival of big names in the game. Spotify launched video podcasts last year for both free and premium users. And earlier this month, Facebook announced a partnership with Spotify that will allow users to hear podcasts pulled from the streaming platform in the social media app itself. Spotify has also announced plans of entering the domain of live audio chatroom, a trend popularized by Clubhouse last year.

Spotify player integration in the Facebook app is also in the pipeline

Looking over to the competition, Amazon Music introduced podcasts in September last year, roping in some popular names such as DJ Khaled, Becky G, and Will Smith for exclusive content. Amazon then followed it by acquiring podcast-maker Wondery a few months later and merged it with the Amazon Music division. Less than a month later in January of 2021, Twitter announced the acquisition of Breaker, the self-proclaimed podcast app with a social media touch.

The post Spotify explores podcast subscriptions, but unlike Apple, it won’t charge creators appeared first on Pocketnow.

How to watch the Apple ‘Spring Loaded’ event

Apple is all set to host its first hardware event of 2021. The company will be holding its ‘Spring Loaded’ event on Tuesday, April 20, at 10 AM Pacific Time. It will be an online live stream. We expect Apple to launch a new iPad Pro, AirTags, and iMac and Mac Pro, and possibly AirPods Pro 2. Here’s what you can expect from the Apple ‘Spring Loaded’ event.

As mentioned above, Apple’s Spring Loaded will be an online-only event. You can watch the live stream below. This is one of the most efficient ways to stream an event as a YouTube live stream can be viewed on every platform where YouTube is available – smartphones, tablets, consoles, smart TVs and more.

You can also stream the event on Apple Events website, which works in Safari, Chrome, Firefox, and other main browsers. You can visit the site now to add an event reminder to your calendar.

Apple is likely to launch two iPad Pro models – 11-inch and 12.9-inch. As per the leaks and rumors, you shouldn’t expect a design overhaul. It could launch a new mini-LED display-equipped iPad Pro. The 11-inch variant might stick with an LCD display, and you are likely to get a mini-LED panel on the bigger model. Further, the next iPad Pro is expected to bring a new more powerful processor that is said to be similar to the M1 Silicon. It could introduce Mac interoperability, which means you’d be able to run some macOS apps on the iPadOS. The 12.9-inch most is might come equipped with 5G antennas, and there is a possibility for this technology to extend to the smaller 11-inch model.

AirTags are also said to be launched at the Apple Spring Loaded event. The object tracker could have a round profile with a white paint job on one side, and a metallic finish on the other side with an Apple logo. AirTags is said to use Bluetooth connectivity and an Apple chip inside to quickly pair with your iPhone or other compatible devices. It is rumored that AirTags will be accessible from the “Items” tab in the Find My app. We could also get Apple Silicon-powered iMac and Mac Pro.

 

The post How to watch the Apple ‘Spring Loaded’ event appeared first on Pocketnow.

Samsung and Hulu partner for a reality series that follows creative photographers

It's only fair to share...Share on RedditShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Tumblr

Samsung has announced a unique kind of partnership today. The company is partnering with Hulu, Westbrook Media, and BBH Entertainment to execute a first-of-its-kind mobile photography reality series, Exposure. It is set to debut on Hulu starting April 26.

The show will feature organic integrations with the Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra 5G and compelling storytelling through themed challenges. Exposure is said to inspire and encourage viewers to explore their own creativity with readily available smartphone camera technology that has become an integral part of everyday life. 

The series includes following creative photographers as they complete weekly challenges to find America’s best mobile photographer. The show challenges photographers to put the Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra 5G cameras to the test by showcasing all the incredible things they can capture using the phone. “The Galaxy S21 Ultra 5G is Samsung’s ultimate smartphone experience, pushing the limits of what a smartphone can do with its standout pro-grade camera system,” says Samsung.

“The partnership on Exposure cements Hulu as the perfect streaming home for the series, tapping into Hulu’s younger audience of TV fans as well as inspiring the next generation of budding photographers and tech enthusiasts,” said the press release.

The series represents a partnership in which each company brings its specialty:

  • Samsung creates smartphones that inspire creativity with powerful camera capabilities
  • BBH Entertainment brings expertise in ideating entertaining formats for brands and publishers
  • Hulu offers brands the opportunity to develop, co-create, and strategically market projects in a visionary new way for the streaming era
  • Westbrook Media provides skillful creative and production capabilities

 

Exposure, which will feature the Galaxy S21 Ultra 5G will debut on Hulu and starts streaming on April 26.

 

 

 

 

The post Samsung and Hulu partner for a reality series that follows creative photographers appeared first on Pocketnow.

It's only fair to share...Share on RedditShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Tumblr

Spotify is going all-in on the hottest social media trend right now

Ever since the pandemic struck, one trend that has suddenly skyrocketed to social media stardom is live audio or chatrooms. Popularized by Clubhouse, users are able to hold a live audio chat session that others can tune in to. Twitter was quick to jump on the opportunity with Spaces. Then came Facebook with its own audio chatroom ambitions. Even Telegram and Slack have embraced it. And the latest name to jump the bandwagon is music streaming giant Spotify.

“Creators and fans have been asking for live formats on Spotify, and we’re excited that soon, we’ll make them available to hundreds of millions of listeners and millions of creators on our platform. The world already turns to us for music, podcasts, and other unique audio experiences, and this new live audio experience is a powerful complement that will enhance and extend the on-demand experience we provide today.”
Gustav Söderström, Chief Research & Development Officer at Spotify

Spotify has acquired Betty Labs, the creator of a live audio app called Locker Room. In the coming months, the company aims to leverage its reach and expertise to open Locker Room to more creators and create content catering to a wide range of genres. In its press release, Spotify has announced that it will rope in writers, musicians, professional athletes, and globally renowned personalities to produce content ranging from AMA (Ask Me Anything) sessions to live discussions and debates.

The company adds that it will exploit insights and data from its music streaming platform to create a huge diversity of live as well as on-demand shows for its users across the globe. Right now, Spotify hasn’t specified if, or when, Locker Room will continue to exist as a standalone service, or if it will be merged with the eponymous music streaming brand. However, Betty Labs founder and CEO Howard Akumiah notes that they will open the experience to Spotify’s massive user base, and that the content will expand beyond the realm of sports and into the world of music and culture as well.

 

The post Spotify is going all-in on the hottest social media trend right now appeared first on Pocketnow.

Hisense L5F Series Laser Cinema offers a complete home theater solution

Hisense is bringing an even bigger cinema experience to your home with its new L5F Series Laser Cinema. It comes with 4K color range, built-in speakers with dbx-tv cinematic sound – all of this on the Android TV platform. It offers a complete home theater solution with a new 120-degree ambient light rejecting screen. It is now available to purchase at Amazon, BeachCamera.com and Vanns.com for USD 4,999.99.

The 120” L5 Laser Cinema is equipped with the Android TV platform. Viewers can choose from more than 5,000 apps and games including Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, Prime Video, Disney+, HBO Max and much more. Android TV also comes with built-in Google Assistant, so consumers can use the voice remote to quickly access their smart home devices, check out what they want to watch.

“The Laser Engine is a breakthrough in TV product development, redefining the way that TVs can present images, and leading the next generation of display technology,” says the company.

The L5 utilizes a blue laser light source to create razor-sharp, precise images. It can reach nearly 2,700 lumens and span over a billion colors. Together with Hisense patented technologies, the L5 brings laser-focused detail and brightness only seen in cinemas to your home.

You get a big screen experience with a 120” ambient light-rejecting screen. Positioned at only 13.8 inches from the wall, the ultra short throw TV produces a picture that is bright and detailed in any type of lighting, bringing the cinematic experience home – not just in color quality and sound – but also in size.

The L5 exceeds the Rec. 709 standard UHD color range, and reaches 83% of DCI-P3. This means a highly accurate and enhanced spectrum of color that makes images more realistic, natural, and true-to-life. It also supports HDR10 and HLG decoding, and comes with embedded 30W speakers.

 

The post Hisense L5F Series Laser Cinema offers a complete home theater solution appeared first on Pocketnow.